If you’ve ever wondered how to get your hair as long and shiny as a model’s, then you may have heard about the magical phenomenon of biotin. Same if you’ve ever wanted stronger nails and better skin--biotin is the recommended supplement, right? It says it right there on the bottle.

What’s all the hype about anyway?

In this post, we’ll be covering 6 interesting facts about biotin, and then go over the potential harm it can do to your skin if you are even the slightest bit acne prone and sometimes, even if you have never had acne before.

Starting with...

Fact #1: Most people get enough biotin in their diet, as it exists in many everyday foods.

Fact #2: Biotin deficiency is extremely rare.

Fact #3: There are no known cases of overdosing on Biotin, as it is water soluble and flushes out of the system easily.

Fact #4: Biotin, B7, and Vitamin H are all the same thing.

Fact #5: Raw egg white contains avidin which naturally inhibits the effects of biotin.

Fact #6: Long term use of antibiotics may hinder the integration of biotin in the body by killing off healthy gut bacteria.

So what does all this have to do with your acne?

If you are not biotin deficient (as in, losing your hair and having brittle nails), eating raw egg whites every day, using antibiotics for a long period of time, or pregnant, there is really no reason to consider taking a biotin supplement. Foods like bread, chocolate, egg yolks, fish, nuts, oatmeal, meat, poultry, and whole wheat all contain more than enough biotin to keep your body healthy.

So why are biotin supplements so popular?

Biotin is essential in keeping your skin, hair, nails, and body organs healthy there’s no doubt about that. But most people are misinformed as to how much of it their body actually needs. The recommended dosage of biotin supplements is 30 mcg per day. But your body already produces that much on its own.

There is little scientific research that supports the claim that biotin actually makes your hair grow longer and shinier (unless you take it in mass quantities), but it does do something interesting to your skin: it makes it overproduce skin cells.

Acne is generally caused by bacteria and dead skin cells clogging the pores. So what happens when an acne prone person starts taking biotin? Typically, more acne. Or even cystic acne, even if you have never had it before.

The safest way to avoid the potential dangers of biotin supplements is to simply avoid taking them altogether. Unless you’re in a small group of specific people who need more than the average amount of biotin for daily life, there is no scientific research saying that it will help your skin and hair on its own. But trust me, your skin can definitely do without it.

To learn more about supplementation and how to clear your acne without prescriptions click here.

acne care mistakes avoidMarketing geniuses would love to have you believe that their most famous acne clearing products are safe and do exactly what they advertise--clear your skin. But sadly, this is simply not the case for the products we are about to review in this article.

Many doctors and dermatologists are prescribing products for your acne that either aren’t going to work as well as they should, or aren’t going to work at all.

Today we’ll get into the reasons why these products don’t work and what you can use for your acne that actually works.

Cetaphil

The first one we’ll start with is Cetaphil. According to Cetaphil’s website, it is a “Gentle Skin Care Product” that is “clinically tested and proven to cleanse, hydrate, and protect acne-prone skin.”

That’s all fine and dandy until you look at the list of ingredients in their product.

According to the experts, here is a list of ingredients that will clog your pores.You’ll notice that the ingredient sodium laureth sulfate is on there. Guess what Cetaphil has in it? Sodium laureth sulfate.

Although sodium laureth sulfate only scores a 3 out of 5 on the pore clogging scale (0 being non clogging and 5 being extremely clogging), it still makes you wonder, how have they gotten away with marketing this product to be good for acne for so long when it clearly isn’t?

It’s unfortunate that such products are being branded to help acne, when in fact, it will just make it worse.

Clearasil

The next surprisingly pore clogging product is Clearasil. Yes, you read that right. Clearasil has been branded the expert and leading acne control product for teenagers. But what's really going on in their formula?

They do have some good stuff going on, although it's in such low doses, it's hard to say if it will actually help clear your skin.

For example, salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide do help in treating acne. But Clearasil also contains myristic acid and lauric acid, which scored 3 and 4 respectively on the pore clogging scale.

Clearasil is the first product that many people turn to when they first get acne and for some, it might actually help. But for many, it only exacerbates the problem and makes a bad situation worse.

Retinol A

Next off, we have Retinol A. Although this product is available under many different names, including Retin-A and Tretinoin, don't let them fool you. It is branded as a medication used to treat acne and usually has to be prescribed by a doctor in order to obtain it, although it can also be purchased online.

On Web MD, Retinol A is said to work by affecting the growth of growth of skin cells and admits that it may make your acne worse at first but will get better after 8-12 weeks.

The reality is that it makes your acne worse because it contains isopropyl myristate (which scores a staggering 5 on the pore clogging scale) and stearic acid (which scores a 3 on the pore clogging scale.)

Coconut Oil and its derivatives

Last on our list is Coconut Oil and its derivatives. Acne is caused by a buildup of oil in the skin. Therefore, it seems strange to claim that coconut oil does something to help with acne.

The popular website, Healthline.com, claims "Coconut oil is high in lauric acid, which helps kill the bacteria that cause acne."

Lauric acid rates at a 4 on the pore clogging scale. Whether or not it possesses the qualities to kill bacteria on your skin (which is not what causes acne in the first place anyway) the mere fact that it contains such a pore clogging ingredient makes it less than convincing when it comes to clearing up your acne.

The upside about coconut oil about it is that it smells really good! But it's just not so great for your skin, unfortunately.

These are just a few of the expertly branded products that claim to help acne but really don't. We suggest you do your own research and don't fall for the hype when it comes to selecting products to help with your acne.

Now if you really want to get your skin clear, schedule an appointment with us. We have individualized products and treatment plans that you can't get anywhere else and have been tried and proven to help get skin clear and maintain clear skin for life.

What are you waiting for? The next step is finding out what will work to get your skin where you want it to be.

Click here to set up your appointment today.

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